The Worst Plumbing Problem: Sewer Line Issues

by on Feb 20 2013 - 35 Comments

We recently had an unexpected plumbing problem that resulted in us finding out there is a costly repair that we will need to make to the sewer line. Here’s how it happened:

A couple hours after we get home from the airport on Sunday night, our renter comes upstairs to tell us there is water on the floor. After looking for leaks, we realize it was all coming from the drain on the basement floor backing up, causing water to overflow and spread to her bathroom.

  • After a quick Google search (what did people do before Google?!?) I realized we would need the drain cleared out and the expected cost was approximately $270-$300.
  • The next morning, a plumber comes out and informs me the only exposed sewer clean out was under the toilet…an additional $130 expense bringing the total cost to $409.
  • After clearing out a bunch of roots, he is unable to make it all the way to the main (city) sewer line. He hits some resistance at 75 feet and only a 1-inch blade makes it through (vs. 4+ inches for the rest of the line). He recommends having a camera look at what is causing the issue. Another $75.
  • The next day we get a camera down there and everything looks great all the way to 80 feet, where the camera shows the issue: a leaking joint, which means the seals between pipes have broken, disconnected or corroded, allowing waste water to escape into the areas surrounding the pipe. The cost for repair? $6,700.

Before I get into the specifics of why sewer line problems really, really, really suck, I want to share the main conundrum of this all: no one knows if the line will even back up again anytime soon.

Here’s how the conversation played out between me and the plumber:

Me: So, what are the chances that it will back up again? How often will it back up?

Plumber: It will definitely back up again, but how often is the million dollar question.

Me: Or, in my case, the $6,700 question.

Plumber: No one can know when it will back up, or how often. The problem is, it’s just a band-aid and eventually it will need to be fixed. Did you want to do it or not?

Me: I think I want to just wait and see how often it backs up. If it can be put off I’d prefer that.

Plumber: Okay, well unfortunately you are responsible for the pipe all the way to where it connects to the main sewer line. Even if it’s under the road or across the street. We can snake it each time it backs up, but it’s a band-aid and not a permanent fix.

Me: Great.

So I brainstormed why sewer line repairs suck, and here’s what I came up with:

  • Expensive – I had a friend who said they were quoted closer $10k-$14k for a sewer line repair. These repairs aren’t cheap and require a lot of digging, potentially digging up of sidewalks and/or the road.
  • Doesn’t add value to the house – When you get a house appraised, they assume all the sewer lines are working correctly. In a situation like this, there is a chance that the previous owner never had issues and therefore has no idea about the problem. Even worse is if someone sells the house who has never lived in it, where they basically don’t have to disclose anything.

    Further, the inspector would not catch something like this during their inspection of the home. It’s not like they send a camera down the sewer line during the inspection.

  • It has to be done – Because we know about the issue, even if it never backs up again we will still have to make the repair. Why? Because we essentially have a “starter home” and there is no way a first-time home buyer, or any home buyer for that matter, would purchase the house without demanding we pay for the repair.

Ultimately, it’s not a great feeling to be stuck with this problem. I’ve accepted the fact that we will have to make the repair, hopefully later on when we have the money set aside for it. I’m grateful this happened now versus closer to when we are planning on selling and buying a new home.

All I know is…sewer line problems suck!

Have you ever had an expensive home repair come up? How did you react?
____________
Photo by Daniel X. O’Neil
 

34 comments
quintrent13
quintrent13

That really does seem like the worse kind of plumbing issue to have. If your sewer line is having issues or breaks, then you can really be in some trouble. You will not be able to use any appliances in your home that use water, be able to use your sinks, or be able to even take a shower in your own home. None of those things you will want to deal with, but sometimes you have to. That is why you need to make sure that you get regular check ups on your plumbing to ensure that this does not happen.
 http://allrightplumbingandhvac.com/Services/

MonetaryMusings
MonetaryMusings

I bet they'd knock off a chunk of money if you could somehow DIY the hole digging... if only. My sister has been successfully putting off this repair for a few years now. They have it cleared pre-emptively once a year.

Financial Black Sheep
Financial Black Sheep

Wow sounds like the worst problem to have!  I am so sorry for all that trouble you are and will have to go through.  Not to mention expenses too.  

 

I recently had sewer back up into both my bathrooms and sit in the tubs.  First plumber cleaned it out enough to have it come back in a day.  I had a funeral to jet off too, so was hoping the same plumber was coming out again with a camera.  He never came, and I came back to no useable sewer / water.  I had to call another guy who finally said it wasn't our problem (we own a mobile home), so I had to get the HOA to fix the problem.  Turned out the whole pipe was corroded and had been leaking into the ground for a long time.  I should show you the nasty, rusted pipe picture YUCK. 

RFIndependence
RFIndependence

that really sucks! most of our building problems have had to do with plumbing so far, but we caught them early thankfully. Having a water pump mean we don't depend on the sewage system and that is a relief. I would fix it now because who knows what worse problem you can get down the road... sounds like delaying a dental problem...

Eyesonthedollar
Eyesonthedollar

Why do plumbing problems always happen when you go on vacation? That same thing was an issue at our rental property, but we knew it before we bought and weren't going to buy if the owner didn't fix it or drastically lower the price. He did neither, and we waited for several months. His original quote was $10K-$12K, but then he got another one for $4K and had it fixed before we made an offer. I would get a few quotes for sure. 

JustinatTheFrugalPath
JustinatTheFrugalPath

I know what you mean about house repairs sucking. Our roof started to leak a year ago and it really sucked. We were just about out of debt when we were plunged back in.

I wish you luck with your sewer problem DC.

iHeartBudgets
iHeartBudgets

Wow, sorry to hear it man! Sounds like you're stuck with it :( . But, look at it this way, you are adding value to your home, because in it's current state, it's probably worth $20k - $30k less if someone knows it needs this repair. Plus, most potential buyers would just walk away. So it is an investment to get you back to the proper selling price.

TacklingOurDebt
TacklingOurDebt

Big issues like that always suck! Our family home had \ has the same issue with roots. Our basement flooded a number of times when I lived there, but we always managed to clean it up quite quickly. Then my father got into the habit of having the pipes snaked every year, because, come Spring it can easily flood again. A few years ago my father had the pipes snaked but the guy couldn't get all the way through, like yours. A few months later a snow and rainstorm hit and my parent's basement flooded so bad that they lost everything that was down there. Not a pretty picture.

RobertaRenstromNyquist
RobertaRenstromNyquist

Gary just had that done about a year ago. You are learning the love/hate relationship of home ownership. There is no such thing as a safe home purchase. Even new homes can experience problems. But, fortuantely, overall, the good does outweigh the bad.

DebtRoundUp
DebtRoundUp

I hate sewer work.  I have a post in the works about my main drain issues, where instead of paying the $5000 they said it would cost, I fixed it myself for only $20 and about 4 hours worth of work.  The issue was not what the plumber had thought.  Saved my butt some serious cash.

Ugifter
Ugifter

Clay pipes are common in Toronto, where my in laws live.  Years ago they had done the line from the house to the road, digging up the front yard, etc.  The week before our wedding (rehearsal dinner at their house, all of my family staying there, etc), the lines under the basement floor started backing up!!!  So they had to jackhammer out the floor, temporarily turn the water off and replace a bunch.  They had to decide if they wanted to do just the main line, or to go to the unused basement bathroom as well.  They didn't know where the lines ran, they'd just have to take out the floor and follow the pipe, so they opted not to do the whole thing (not the best decision, imo).

SenseofCents
SenseofCents

Ugh that stinks! We have some home repairs that need to be done before we sell. Not looking forward to that.

AverageJoeMoney
AverageJoeMoney

I feel your pain, DC! My worst homeowner problem ever was roots in the sewer line. You're right on: they come back again and again and until it's properly fixed it's going to happen again. Ours ended up being seasonal. When it rained heavily (mostly in the spring) our basement would flood. I waited three years. In retrospect, I should have taken care of it sooner, but at the time, I had a ton of other bills that were priorities.

FrugalRules
FrugalRules

Wow, sorry to hear about that DC! And to come home from a nice vacation to boot. We had something like this very thing happen a number of years ago, but thankfully it was while we were renting and the landlord had to foot the entire bill.

GregatClubThrifty
GregatClubThrifty

Yuck! We have actually had a very similar thing happen - without the leak...at 10 PM...the night before we were supposed to leave on a vacation. It was not long after we bought this house. Luckily, the cost was not even close to what you are experiencing because we had no leak. Sorry man. That sucks.